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| chris.ginnelly@sandler.com
 

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Of course we can dramatically mess up a communication with a prospect with our words; however, in almost all cases our body language and tonality will determine how successful we are in interacting with our prospect.

To be successful, you must quickly relate your product or service to the prospect's pain and establish how you can help to eliminate that pain and achieve their goals. This is not the time to use buzzwords or to make the conversation all about you. A smart thirty-second commercial is more about the prospect.

Sandler provides an easy way to remember the five key components of getting a mutually beneficial conversation started: the simple mnemonic PLATE.


Think of it this way. To have a civilized dinner, you first put the food on the plate. The same is true for a civilized conversation. Get the mutual agreements on the PLATE, up-front, before you get started. Here’s how it breaks down.

 

1. Failing to Provide Value

During initial meetings with prospective clients, some salespeople, whether by design or lack of proper preparation, don’t communicate anything of real value. Sure, they talk about their company’s capabilities. They talk about their products and services...and the associated features, functions, bene ts, and advantages. But they don’t convey any knowledge or insight about the prospects’ challenges or goals that the prospects didn’t already possess.

There are lots of reasons that some SaaS businesses don't scale (more of those in future articles) and another common mistake in the sales process is not setting an expectation with the prospect about will happen on the demo and what decision or decisions that the prospect should expect to make.

There are lots of reasons that some SaaS businesses don't scale (more of those in future articles) and another common mistake in the sales process is not setting an expectation with the prospect about will happen on the demo and what decision or decisions that the prospect should expect to make.

 

There are lots of reasons that some SaaS businesses don't scale (more of those in future articles) but I've yet to have a conversation with any of those that are struggling that haven't had the following characteristic:

Their sales process revolves around a demo and they rush to that demo without an effective questioning strategy.